Tag Archives: mystery

Blown Away: the Sculpture of Penny Hardy

Metal is often seen as cold, hard and inert, but one artist has found a way to adapt the material so it appears loose, alive and free. British artist Penny Hardy makes life-sized human sculptures from discarded metal, each one exploring an emotion or experience. These are installed in open-air settings, in fields or gardens or overlooking water.

Hardy originally trained as a scientific illustrator, which taught her to examine the intricacies of natural forms and observational draftsmanship. Throughout her consequent working life alongside architects and designers, she developed a deep interest in three-dimensional forms. These skills informed her later work as a sculptor—and here she is self-taught over the last fifteen years. 

You Blew Me Away


She was drawn to creating human forms out of discarded objects and seems particularly attuned to a sense of movement and energy within material form, capturing these in all her pieces, transforming inert materials into sculptures with a tangible energy. ‘The sense of movement and dynamics within sculpture provides it with its own life and vitality,’ Hardy states.

In the Blown Away series, she chose to use old metal machinery parts because these were made to be resilient and strong, yet were thrown away at the slightest hint of failure. Hardy felt that these imperfect pieces should be recycled to show some of the effects machinery has had on our lives and the environment. She says, ‘By using discarded, man-made metal items—which have been so skillfully made and used to create their own mechanical energy—I hope to extend their life in another form, re-use that energy for a different purpose, and exchange their function to create a new entity.’ You Blew Me Away (159cm x 75cm x 55cm) and Erosion (159cm x 45cm x 45cm) are examples.

Angels in Harlem

Hardy’s dance figures are wonderful affirmations of life and movement. Inspired by the dynamic forms of contemporary dancers, they use a flexible material like aluminium to re-create a visual sense of movement. Angels in Harlem (300cm x 200cm x 750cm), for instance, is a sculpture on stilts designed to gently sway in any breeze, creating a sense of constant movement.

Hardy has exhibited throughout the UK since her first public exhibition of dance sculptures in 2006, including at Doddington Hall, Hill House Dartington and Royal West of England Academy. More about the artist can be found on her website here

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Filed under Art, Arts, contemporary art, Earth, Environmentalism, installation, installation art, land art, public art, Sculpture, Uncategorized

Windspirals and hanging pods: the art of Bromwyn Berman

The Australian artist Bromwyn Berman makes public and installation art as well as sculpture, drawings and paintings. Her alluring works relate intimately to, and reflect on, the natural world. The art seeks to ‘encourage a respect for our place in the evolution of landscape as part of the processes of nature.’ Organic signs and symbols recur – spirals, circles, pods, mandalas, honeycomb forms – and she uses a variety of materials, including copper wire, aluminium, stainless steel, stones, mulberry paper, bees wax, tree roots, charcoal, plant remains from rivers. These natural and man-made materials ‘evidence our interface with nature.’

Berman 3

Windspiral 2006

Berman windspiral

Her public artworks and larger sculptural installations focus on landscape and natural systems; they speak to what she calls ‘our inner knowing of the earth body.’ Her studio practice, paper works, drawings and small sculpture explore ‘the simplest and most basic signifiers of natural systems’; they inquire into ‘archetypal forms of geometry as well as themes of the recurring mysteries that form the foundation of our experience.’ She believes in a deep collective consciousness, which art can put humans in touch with. Some might say this puts her within a visionary or spiritual aesthetic tradition, though her work is viscerally grounded, in roots, branches, copper wire, mulberry paper.

The breathtaking ‘Windspiral’ (2006), made of aluminium and stainless steel with timber support (120cm x 300cm x 300cm), was installed at the Sculpture by the Sea exhibition, Sydney, 2006. Berman says, ‘The shape is that of the wind, the colour and texture are the Australian bush where things are silvery and scratchy.’ The inspiration for this work came from living high on a cliff in the Australian bush as well a joyful day spent making artwork with a friend in this special windy place. She has made various other ‘Windspirals’ for different locations.

Berman 2

Banksia Women

Her series of ‘Banksia Women’ (2011), pods woven from copper with river stones (140cm x 50cm x 50cm), were exhibited in various locations across Australia. The pod, Berman believes, is a deeply ‘known’ form, an ‘encapsulation of life to come, a concentration or distillation of all that is complex in nature, containing seeds of new life or… the promise of transformation to new form.’

Berman - the Portal

The Portal

‘The Portal’ (2013) is a circle of aluminium and stainless steel (120cm x 120cm x 20cm) suspended in woodland. Again, we have an organic form that may elicit a response from an ‘inner knowing’; and a form that suggests a liminal place or doorway with all the associations of transition and transformation. The work was exhibited at Sculpture at Scenic World, 2013.

Her ‘River to River: Interwoven Landscapes’ exhibitions at the Penrith Regional Gallery, Australia (2014), included various wonderfully titled sculptures and artworks: ‘Murmurings’ (215cm x 215cm x 30cm) is a mandala made from fragments of Casurina (River Oak) roots nailed onto paper; ‘There is another alphabet’ (25cm x 22cm x13cm) is made of Japanese mulberry paper, Moulin Delaroc paper and waxed Linen thread, with the paper contact-printed with plants from the Nepean River; and ‘You and I have floated on the stream’ (300cm x 60cm x 50cm) is an animated river of paper contact-printed with plants from the Nepean River and with Casurina roots.

Berman - The Murmurings

The Murmurings 2014

Berman - there is anothe alphabet

There is another alphabet 2014

berman - you and I have floated on the stream 2014

You and I have floated on the stream

 

Berman’s beautiful, enigmatic art changes the viewer, inspires them and engenders reflection; her pieces speak of the natural world and our place within it, using a language rooted in a material alphabet, one of paper, tree branches, thread, wax.

More about the artist can be found on her website (where quotes here were taken from) http://www.bronwynberman.com.au

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Filed under Art, Arts, contemporary art, Earth, Environmentalism, imagination, installation art, Myth, natural world, Nature, Photography, Psychogeography, public art, River, Sculpture, Uncategorized

A Found Alley Gallery: Involuntary Abstraction

‘Art’s whatever you choose to frame’ (Fleur Adcock)

In a local alleyway, we find a series of three abstract artworks on the side of an abandoned, boarded-up building. Each appears to be by a different (local?) artist and in a distinct style of abstraction.

Found Alley Gallery

Found Alley Gallery

From left to right in the photo above (see also individual photos below), the first artwork, Involuntary Abstraction by Nicholson Haddock, is rather raw and gestural in its forms, with graffiti layered over parts; the second, Parallel Textures by Anne Dinsky, is more textural and subtle in execution, with muted grey and sandy colours and vertical white parallel lines; the third, The Vertigo of Vision by Joan Biro, is a dense work with a fuzzy, anarchic composition that moves the eye around dizzyingly – this artwork is mainly black and white, but has spots of blue and half-erased words in red.

On the bottom corner of the third artwork (see photo below) appears the Fleur Adcock quote: ‘Art’s whatever you choose to frame’. Does this mean these artworks have been ‘framed’ by adding titles/names, so the public can see them not as abandoned, boarded-up windows but as involuntary or ‘found’ art? A Duchampian or conceptual intervention in a public space?

Involuntary Abstraction Nicholson Haddock, 2015

Involuntary Abstraction
Nicholson Haddock, 2015

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Parallel Textures Anne Dinsky, 2015

Parallel Textures
Anne Dinsky, 2015

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The Vertigo of Vision Joe Biro, 2015

The Vertigo of Vision
Joe Biro, 2015

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February Oodlings and Doodlings

February Oodlings and doodlings: or some things I did and pondered in February (which may or may not be true…)

all tied up1 sepia

‘All Tied Up’

I saw a cloud in the form of a giant sky-turtle. I wondered about a dystopian world in which clouds are used as advertising billboards. I tweeted about imaginary essays by Jorge Luis Borges and about graveyards of red telephone boxes. I watched two mesmerising foreign documentaries, Nostalgia for the Light, and Le Quattro Volte, and wrote a song inspired by the former. I ate far too much chocolate, albeit dark, 85% organic. I sat by the river one night and spoke to a huge, gold-glowing magic fish in the water.

I celebrated writer Russell Hoban’s birthday on February 4th by putting quotes by him up around the village green and by the river. I listened to blue-tit and collared dove song each morning and wondered if birds sing in their dreams. I took photographs of knots and chains by the river’s edge and of silhouettes on a jetty; and I took a video of feet walking along a jetty. I had some funny conversations with a punning cat. I wrote most of a short story. I decided, in a pretentious moment, that reflections in windows at night intimate the real, slippery, multi-dimensional nature of reality far more than the clear light of day does. I rediscovered the beauty and eccentricity of singer-songwriter Regina Spektor.

I had an email correspondence with a friend about Keats’s art of negative capability, the ability to live with doubt, uncertainty and mystery – I concluded that I was aspirant but wanting in this respect. I spent quite a bit of the month in a bad relapse of the chronic illness I have, in significant amounts of pain, but congratulated myself on handling it with a degree of stoicism. I read an impressive surreal novel, Liquidambar, by the New Zealand writer Chris Bell. I had fish and chips at the end of a glistening road with my mother. I got angry yet again with the government for their treatment of the poor and sick, for their policies of austerity that are plunging the poor into greater poverty even as the rich stock up their coffers. I fell in love with life whilst watching the charming, gentle video of the Kings of Convenience’s I’d Rather Dance Than Talk with You.

(Note I got this summary-of-month idea from another blog I sometimes visit, tho that blog only does real events)

Cloud in the Form of a Giant Sky-Turtle?

turtle

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Graduated Mystery: A Dada Poem

Capture

By Whimsylph (generated, in large part, through random techniques)

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Filed under Arts, Dada, Surrealism